January 24, 2022

Climate Change News

Saving The Planet

Plant food companies face criticism from environmentalists

Also, an analysis conducted by an external firm for Impossible Foods concluded that their vegetable burger used a considerably smaller amount of water and soil and created fewer emissions than its animal-derived For other food products, Impossible Foods has…

Also, an analysis conducted by an external firm for Impossible Foods concluded that their vegetable burger used a considerably smaller amount of water and soil and created fewer emissions than its animal-derived equivalents. For other food products, Impossible Foods has commissioned similar analyzes that also include details about its supply chains and its land and water use for each product.

However, analysts say these reports may not show the full picture of how the production of burgers, sausages and chicken of plant origin could affect the climate. An Impossible Burger has 21 ingredients, according to the company’s website, including soy.

“Broadly speaking, the problem with plant products is that while they fix a problem, as they combat the fact that meat production generates high levels of carbon and emits a lot of carbon dioxide, they could still contribute to deforestation problems, depending of what ingredients they use and their sources of origin, ”said Sustainalytics Double. “It takes space to grow soybeans that contain many of these products.”

Brown, of Impossible Foods, has acknowledged that soy is a key ingredient in the company’s products, but argued that much of the soy grown in the world is used to feed animals and that Impossible Foods uses it. more efficiently than animals.

In addition, Brown said it would be “ridiculous” for the company, which uses coconut oil in its products, to try to verify how many coconut shells are recycled or thrown away.

“To be completely honest, it’s a very small fraction of the positive impact we’re having,” he said. “We’ll report this if necessary, but really, you’re deviating from the subject if you’re obsessed with that kind of thing.”

Trying to account for each sustainability measure “is a ridiculous use of our resources,” he said. “It will make us less shocked because we are wasting resources to fill out an Excel sheet instead of trying to save the planet.”

Julie Creswell is a New York-based reporter. It has covered banks, private capital, retail and health care. He previously worked for Fortune Magazine and also wrote on debt, monetary policy and investment funds at Dow Jones.@julie_creswell



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